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Free UK Delivery   |   30 Days Return Policy

Moh's Hardness of our Rings


Scratch resistance of our rings


The Mohs scale of hardness is a test that determines the scratch resistance of a metal to give you an idea of how it will stand up to scratches and abrasions in wear. The higher the number, then the more scratch resistant a metal would be.


A higher number will scratch a lower number, so diamond at 10 will scratch glass at 5.5, but glass will not scratch a diamond.

This should not be confused with mailability which is the likely hood of a metal bending, or how a metal would react with an impact. For instance, silver (Mohs hardness of 2.8) will not shatter or break if dropped, but glass which is harder at 5.5 certainly will break under impact.


It is true to say that rings will scratch in wear, it just depends how quickly, and how resistant they are. You should remember that scratch resistant does not mean scratch proof.


It is true that the first scratch is the worst on your new shiny ring, however over time these scratches build up to find their own equilibrium. Have a look at someones wedding ring that is a few years old to see how settled it now looks.


We have included the Mohs hardness values for each of our materials below for your information.


Sterling Silver

Sterling Silver Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 2.8

Gold

Gold Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 2.8 to 4.0 depending on alloys

Platinum

Platinum Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 4.5

Palladium

Palladium Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 4.5

Titanium

Titanium Rings Rings


Moh's hardness of 6.0

Tantalum

Tantalum Rings


Moh's hardness of 6.5

Cobalt

Cobalt Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 7.0

Tungsten

Tungsten Carbide Rings


Moh's hardness of 9.0

Zirconia Ceramic

Black Wedding Rings


Moh's hardness of 9.0